Is “calories in vs. calories out” really the key to weight loss?

When it comes to body change, there’s no topic more polarizing than “calories in vs. calories out.” Some argue it’s the be-all and end-all of weight loss. Others say it’s oversimplified and misguided. Read on to explore every angle of the debate from “eat less, move more,” to hormonal issues, to diets that offer a “metabolic advantage.”

What You Really Need to Know About Weight Loss

Although you probably rationally know that it takes time to see the benefits of training and healthy eating – really accepting this fact is another thing entirely. Many people start an exercise program only to quit when they don’t see dramatic results in a few weeks. Unfortunately, the weight you want to lose took quite a while to get there – and so it’s not going to simply drop off in a few weeks either.

Rethinking New Year’s Resolutions

According to Forbes Magazine, 92% of people don’t achieve their New Year’s resolutions, and 80% of people fail by the end of February. The good news is, you can beat the statistics. It requires a different way of thinking about goal setting. Read on to learn more.

Broccoli and a donut

Rethinking Willpower

Many people say a lack of willpower is their most significant barrier to making positive changes in their lives. Oftentimes this becomes an all-or-nothing belief, where willpower is something external to us, that we either have or don’t have. In fact, the opposite is true. Rather, it’s all about balance, and reworking our approach to our goals and expectations.

Avoid That Holiday Weight Gain – Five Easy Strategies

It’s officially the holiday season again – and with it, the endless parade of food and treats from now through year’s end that, historically for a majority of Americans, leads to 7 to 10 extra pounds by the time we’re singing Auld Lang Syne. So now’s a perfect time for some easy strategies to help beat the holiday bulge.

Perfectionism

The problem is not in having high standards or in working hard. Perfectionism becomes a problem when it causes emotional wear and tear or when it keeps you from succeeding or from being happy. The emotional consequences of perfectionism include fear of making mistakes, stress from the pressure to perform, and self-consciousness from feeling both self-confidence and self-doubt. It can also include tension, frustration, disappointment, sadness, anger or fear of humiliation. These are common experiences for inwardly focused perfectionists.

Three Ways to Turn Back the Clock

Aging is something that most of us would like to deny. But really, it’s not growing old that kills us. Instead, it’s usually one of many “lifestyle” diseases such as certain types of cancers, Type II diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Unfortunately, most of the research dollars go to finding ways to fix these diseases (with pharmaceuticals and increasingly, unregulated nutraceuticals) instead of preventing them from occurring in the first place. So what happens to our bodies as we age, and what can we do to turn back the clock?

To stretch or not to stretch?

There’s a lot of confusion about the value of stretching. Should you stretch before a workout? Or afterwards? Or not at all? Well, as with most things in fitness (and life), there’s no one right answer. Let’s talk about the key variables so you can decide when and how to stretch based on your own needs and goals.

Functional Fitness

Functional fitness is about preparing you for life, rather than something specific like a big race or setting a new personal best on the bench press. Things like squatting down to pick something off the floor, turning and reaching for an item on a high shelf, or carrying a child on your hip or a heavy suitcase.

Get excited about exercise: try something new!

Human beings are creatures of habit. Most of us find comfort in consistency, at least to some degree. Making exercise a consistent habit is one of the best things you can do for yourself. But – when it comes to exercise, having a habit is good, but repeating the same workouts over and over often isn’t. The solution: try something new!

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